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Ultra Documentary

Quite old but "interesting" none the less.  Links are the for the 5 parts for the Italian ultras, in order:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfNq4xJK9q0&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIIsAZNWNfg&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiU7vg-YOkE&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4DHtx3fEJ9k&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWLB-DX_zDM&feature=related
Guest

Nice post... .decent documentary and gives a good insight into the ultras...

its hard to take a stance on them though, do you support them or are you against them... unfortunately its pretty polarising...

I always admired the ultras for making Italian games more of a spectacle than elsewhere, but after the events in catania, it forces you to stop and think about if it is worth upholding a belief like this, even at the cost of life..

I just hope that a compromise can be found, let the ultras have the curvas, but keep the violence to a minimum.... sadly, you cannot change the such a deeply ingrained mindset...

What the documentary failed to do was examine the reason for the ultras existence in the first place, .. I believe them to be an expression of societal problems in italy, and they show it in the only place you can... the Calcio world...
Guest

badman wrote:
Nice post... .decent documentary and gives a good insight into the ultras...

its hard to take a stance on them though, do you support them or are you against them... unfortunately its pretty polarising...

It isn't quite that simple.. There are good and bad points.

Ultras are those who stand in the curva in the driving rain, leave at 11pm for a 3pm game down south (or north), spend time and money making banners, organize choreography, pay thousands a year on petrol money, turn up whether for a promotion, relegation or nothing midtable battle. They are true fans... Only the few that unlawfully use football as a vehicle for their own agenda are the ones that drag the "ultra" name down. And they aren't Ultras, they are petty thugs.

I've written some "articles" on this when bored, but have had a couple of drinks. The Ultra mentality is something that had always interested me though. And sadly it's something the authorities are trying to stamp out.
Guest

Ultras

Brescia



Verona





Livorno



Napoli

Guest

"On the stands you sing, in the police office you shut up."

Myles

But why would you be in the police office if you were only singing?
Guest

Napoli

Guest

@ Myles: Ultras is about much more than singing alone, obviously.

Lazio



(by the way, I see that you are administrator, is it okay for a topic about Ultras to be opened? I'm new here)
Myles

SSL 1900 wrote:
(by the way, I see that you are administrator, is it okay for a topic about Ultras to be opened? I'm new here)


Yes it's okay.


Juve

Dave

Myles wrote:
But why would you be in the police office if you were only singing?


Crimes against melody?
Guest

Guest

Laziali (with Gabriele)



Napoli  



Roma



Doriani



Atalanta



Frosinone



Piacenza

Guest

SSL 1900 wrote:
@ Myles: Ultras is about much more than singing alone, obviously.


(by the way, I see that you are administrator, is it okay for a topic about Ultras to be opened? I'm new here)


Welcome, SSL1900.

I can't imagine anyone would mind with the pictures, but maybe a point of view or even an anecdote or experience of the topic might be nice too.

I remember being at the Delle Alpi next to the Curva when a Milan fan managed to make his way through the older gents (and me) to the edge of the curva. He was waving his arms and shouting trying to rile the hardcore and was swiftly chased away by what I distinctly remember as a couple who resembled Mr Burns and Joan Rivers.
Guest

@ Micky, I understand. I will try to post a bit of everything.



This is the story of ANTONIO DE FALCHI.


Quote:
"On June 4th 1989 ANTONIO DE FALCHI, almost 19, arrives at 8:30 a.m. at the Milan Railway Central Station with three friends. The four guys decide to go to San Siro by themselves, leaving the mob of 40 people which made the trip with them.

After having purchased the tickets, the four go to the gate 16, with the yellow-red scarves hidden in the jackets. It's 11.35 a.m. (the kick off was scheduled at 4 p.m.). Suddenly a person appears. "Do you have a cigarette?" he asks. And then: "What's the time?". The roman accent betrays Antonio and his friends: a signal and about thirty people appears from behind a wall in construction (there were works due to Italy '90). The four roman guys run away. Antonio can't escape, he falls on the ground. They hit him with kicks and punch. After thirty seconds the Milan mob run away because the police arrives. Antonio try to stand up, he's very pale and he breathes very badly; he falls again. One of the cops try to make the mouth to mouth breath and with a cardiac massage. No way. He is immediately put on the ambulance but he arrives to the San Carlo Hospital already dead.

In the meantime the police halts, near the gate 16, three people. They're Daniele F. (29), one of the leaders of "Gruppo Brasato" with a card of the "Order Service" of A.C. Milan, Luca B. (20) and Antonio L. (21). The funeral (payed by AS Roma) is done on june 7th 1989 in the San Giovanni Leonardi Church, in the quarter of Torre Maura in front of 10.000 touched people. There's Dino Viola there (who at the end of the ceremony embrace touched Antonio's mother), Peruzzi, Nela (who talks, touched, with Antonio's brother), Giannini and the whole team of younk kids of AS Roma.





Quote:
On June 7th 1989 the autopsy on the body of Antonio decree the the death came for heart attack. On july 13th 1989 the Milan Court judge seven years of condemnation to Luca B. with temporary freedom, Daniele F. and Antonio L. are absolved because of the lack of evidences."






Quote:
"Your Ultras."
Guest

Quote:
"Some days ago I have finished my time. They told me that I was a man now, that I must be adult, responsible, and that I had to stop entering the Curva Nord, and to quit being an Ultras. Absurd! I wouldn't know how to forget those people who have shaped me, with whom I have lived all those years, who protected me and loved me. I live, in every moment of my existince, with the Ultras mentality, impossible to stop, impossible to change.

I remember my friends from the battles. Their faces, their voices, their actions. I do not want to stop marching next to them. My face will always be directed at the newspapers, my ears on the television. Today just like yesterday, I am ready to be there. And as long as even only one of my Ultras enters a train, I will be next to him. This is my destiny that does not end. Take care lads."


Guest

In memory of Gabriele Sandri.

Quote:
"I've just finished playing, and now, as always, I'm leaving to support you to the victory!"


Sir George

What a bunch of planks!  It's the language of the Spanish Civil War transferred to pathetic and pitiful gang fights.  

What do the Lazio Ultras make of Beppe Signori's arrest or are they too busy masturbating over fascist memorabilia to have heard about it?
Guest

Sir George wrote:
What a bunch of planks! †It's the language of the Spanish Civil War transferred to pathetic and pitiful gang fights. †

What do the Lazio Ultras make of Beppe Signori's arrest or are they too busy masturbating over fascist memorabilia to have heard about it?


This was the risk of opening a topic about Ultras, I suppose.

First of all, Ultras is about so much more than gang fights. It is only a small minority that is violent, exactly like in any other (sub) culture I guess.

Secondly, Beppe Signori has been released, and of course everyone was shocked by the news. He was/is a hero for many.

Thirdly, politics and Italian football culture have always walked hand in hand. Walk around in Livorno, go see a match, and you'll get an idea. Go with the Ultras of Verona, Inter, Lazio, Roma, Varese, Triestina, and you'll see the other side. It's about time that people know/understand/see that it is far from Lazio's hardcore alone who's (far) right-wing. If you like, I can post hundreds (literally) of photos of Roma (or any other club I mentioned) Ultras with fascist symbols, gestures, and so on.
Guest

Ultras from all over Italy come together in Rome, in 2009, to protest against the so-called Tessera del Tifoso.













Guest

Lazio







Sir George

Yes, Beppe has always been a hero of mine, or at least since the time he enthusiastically showed James Richardson his vast collection of Swatches. And I was always miffed that Saachi played him wide on the left (or was it right?) of midfield rather than up front in '94 instead of that lump Massaro.  I'd feel a mild pang of sadness if he ended up prison.

I don't doubt that it's not just the Lazio Ultras that are fascists or at least enjoy the uniforms and the silly salutes.  By "political" you presumably mean the gangs like to attach themselves to political movements, and give it full welly with the symbols, clothing and gestures.  It doesn't make any of it any less pathetic.
Guest

Charlton



It's a work in progress.
Lupo Pazzesco

Diatribe, is the banner well travelled?
Guest

Sir George wrote:
Yes, Beppe has always been a hero of mine, or at least since the time he enthusiastically showed James Richardson his vast collection of Swatches. And I was always miffed that Saachi played him wide on the left (or was it right?) of midfield rather than up front in '94 instead of that lump Massaro. †I'd feel a mild pang of sadness if he ended up prison.

I don't doubt that it's not just the Lazio Ultras that are fascists or at least enjoy the uniforms and the silly salutes. †By "political" you presumably mean the gangs like to attach themselves to political movements, and give it full welly with the symbols, clothing and gestures. †It doesn't make any of it any less pathetic.


That's what I meant, yes. Most groups of Ultras have some kind of (strong) political view/leaning. Like it or not, it's part of the culture. Nevertheless, and I repeat, it's so much more than that. Mainly, Ultras is about passion.
Myles

SSL 1900, the vast majority of members here know what each Ultras group represent, also that there are different tiers of Ultras and also that it is intertwined with society so there is no need to feel you have to educate us in some way just because we don't live in Italy. The members wouldn't go to the trouble of registering on this forum if they were just passive supporters.

I'm not trying to be funny, but telling us about Ultras like we know nothing is a little patronising.
Guest

Lupo Pazzesco wrote:
Diatribe, is the banner well travelled?

Heh, unfortunately not! I made that for Ireland a couple of years ago, Charlton are going to Spain next month which got me all excited and made me dig it out... Until they announced we're err, playing Bristol City and Cardiff.

Quote:
I'm not trying to be funny, but telling us about Ultras like we know nothing is a little patronising.

It's also preaching to the choir.
Guest

Anyway, sort of back on track. This is one of my fave ultra pics, and Wisla Krakow's own way of protesting against the English Model:
http://dailyfootball.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/10.jpg

There is something of an 'ultra' influence making itself seen and heard over here now but it comes across as being artificial, forced and overall a bit sad really.
Guest

Myles wrote:
SSL 1900, the vast majority of members here know what each Ultras group represent, also that there are different tiers of Ultras and also that it is intertwined with society so there is no need to feel you have to educate us in some way just because we don't live in Italy. The members wouldn't go to the trouble of registering on this forum if they were just passive supporters.

I'm not trying to be funny, but telling us about Ultras like we know nothing is a little patronising.


My apologies. I had no idea what to expect of this forum, I didn't mean to be patronising. I hope this topic will become a success!



Used to live in the south (Lecce and Bari) for a while, with my girlfriend at the time. Great derby!
Myles

No problem SSL 1900, we do know about the ideologies but I'm not telling you what to post as that is your choice, i'm all on for hearing more details on Ultras groups. I don't know everything.
Guest

Catania



Verona



Milan





Napoli





Livorno

Guest

Banda Noantri Lazio





Napoli

"Maroni, this is your objective. Sitting and eating a sandwhich."



Followed by: "Maroni, this is our mentality. Now sit down and listen to the song of the Curva A."



Guest

Roma



Napoli

"Every Sunday has become horrible. Empty away sector, the nostalgic away match. This football is at an ever low. Long live the old school Ultras."



Livorno

"Ultras in prison, pedofiles protected."



Lazio

"Calvagna lying bastard."



Calvagna is a film director who wanted to make a film about Ultras in Italy. Used (or better: abused) the name of Gabriele Sandri, said he was a good friend of him (in fact he just had one picture with him, but they were not friends), said he was an Ultras that travelled everywhere (yet he was not there in some dangerous away matches), said he was a top lad of Irriducibili for twenty years (in fact he was not at all). So the lads 'in basso a destra' (Banda Noantri) attacked him with banners. Some guys of Irriducibili tried to take it down, but were stopped by 'in basso a destra'... This was two years ago I believe.

Banda Noantri lads with a banner that reads three names.
Gabriele, murdered Lazio fan.
Ercolano, dead Napoli fan.
Bagna, dead Parma fan.

Guest

Quote:
"Ultras, a way of life.

A split with the normal, the usual. A distinction from the average, the common. Honour, passion, loyalty, friendship. Ultras is about ideals, applied at all times. Old values, respected at all times. Itís not about being the best, its' not about being the first, itís about mentality. A mentality that can only be found among the Ultras. A mentality that is stronger than any repression. Stadium bans, prison sentences, nothing can stop us. We are Ultras, and the repression reinforces our burning passion. We believe in our ideals, and we always will. We do not believe in doing business, in making profit. We believe in the Ultras mentality. This football is sick, completely sick. Itís all about money, money, and even more money. The normal football fan is ignored, the stadiums are empty. The Ultras are the ones to blame, so they say, yet we know better.

We are the very last and most pure thing in football. We pay hundreds of euros and travel thousands of kilometres all across Italy to represent and to defend our city, our colours and our club. The violence is not important, you have it everywhere, in every culture and in every country. They say that the Ultras are ruining the football. It's not. Itís the money thatís ruining it. Itís the drugs, the bribes, the paid referees, the players that earn way too much. We are the ones who shout for our teams, every single day, and every single week. Whether itís snowing, raining, sunny, it doesnít matter. We hate the system, we fight against the repression, and we always will. Our fathers were on the Curva, we are there, our sons will be. We will teach them the old values, and make them understand our mentality, so that they will have the same way of life. Old generations disappear, new ones come, ideals stay the same.

Ultras, a way of life."


Lupo Pazzesco

SSL 1900, have you read 'Football, Fascism & Fandom' about the Roma Boys and the Irriducibli?
Guest

I think we've got enough pictures now SSL, thanks.
Guest

Lupo Pazzesco wrote:
SSL 1900, have you read 'Football, Fascism & Fandom' about the Roma Boys and the Irriducibli?


I haven't, no. Any good? I remember the funeral of the Boys' leader, Zappavigna, many Lazio lads were present then (Irriducibili, Banda Noantri,...). Still today many Roma and Lazio Ultras join forces when it comes to politics in the streets of Rome.
Guest

Micky wrote:
I think we've got enough pictures now SSL, thanks.


Fair enough. Will try to keep it to down to news about Ultras then? Thought it would be nice to be posting photos, but okay....
Guest

Quote:
The funeral of Gabriele Sandri was held today at noon in the parish church where he received his Confirmation, not so many years ago. The church in Piazza Balduina was close to both the family home and the shop which he managed on his parents' behalf. I decided to go. Partly to pay my respects, partly because this whole sad business has left me genuinely upset in many ways. And partly, I suppose, from curiosity.

I caught the 913 bus from the Metro stop at via Lepanto. A chap in his 40s with smart shoes and a tightly furled umbrella got on before me, consulting a small map printed off the internet. I glimpsed it over his shoulder: it showed the route to the church. I hadn't bothered to bring a map before, though I'd never been to this corner of north-western Rome before. I had a feeling that it wouldn't be too hard to find the way.

Already the bus was quite full. Some half a dozen teenagers in Roma caps and scarves were at the back, laughing and joking. Two petite blonde girls, around 20, stood in silence, wearing black bomber jackets with Lazio's sky blue, white and royal blue tricolor on the sleeve and "Irriducibili" embroidered on the front. At each bus stop, more and more people boarded the bus wearing Lazio scarves or else sporting a shaved head and boots look which left little doubt as to their destination. An elderly chap asked one group if they had known Gabriele personally. No, though they knew people who did, came the reply. (As do I, as it happens). A general discussion ensued. The elderly chap said that some things never changed. A chic-looking woman in her 30s with stripy tights said it went to show how you could never trust the police.

We got off the bus and turned into the square in front of the church. It had already begun to drizzle. It was about 11.40am and the place was packed. The steps up to the church were blocked with people, and on all four sides of the piazza crowds were gathering. The majority were young and male, but by no means all. Newspaper estimates suggest that well over 5,000 people were there, maybe more.

Ultras groups from all over the country were represented. I saw groups from Juventus, Taranto, Avellino, Milan, Varese, Genoa, Cremonese and Livorno, as well as scarves I didn't recognise. I made my way over to the railings where close to a huge striscione calling for GIUSTIZIA PER GABRIELE flowers and scarves were piled up. Along with dozens of Lazio scarves and almost as many from Roma were tokens from Udinese, Palermo, Messina, many others. Enormous floral wreaths were sent not only by many of Gabriele's personal friends, but by Antonello Venditti, the celebrated Roma-supporting crooner and creator of Roma's club songs and by ultras groups, from Napoli, Sampdoria, Torino, Milan (the Fossa dei Leoni, dissolved 2 years ago, still sent an imposing mass of scarlet and black blooms).

Meanwhile inside the church - already overflowing with people over an hour before the service began - as well as government representatives and Walter Veltroni were Luciano Spalletti and Francesco Totti (crying, unsurprisingly, as he embraced Sandri's mother) and the whole first, reserve and youth teams of Lazio, along with Delio Rossi.

Those of us stood down in the square could not, of course, see or hear what was going on. The crowd was entirely silent, breaking occasionally into applause for the arrival of the Lazio team and then the family. I found myself standing by the railings in front of the church, next to the capi of the Irriducibili. One of them had ACAB (all cops are bastards) tattooed in kitsch curly letters down the right hand side of his neck, and I moved away a bit. It began to rain a bit harder, and the applause died off as the last mourners entered the church. We stood in silence. A few people here and there were moving through the crowd, seeking out friends. In front of me stood a red-haired woman in her 50s, alone, wearing a lazio scarf over her white cagoul and twisting a handkerchief in her hands.

People behind me spoke with strange, non-Roman accents in hushed voices. The heads of the Banda Noantri arrived and after some quiet discussion with the Irriducibili took advantage of a lull in the rain to put up their huge black plastic standard. Their main capo was prolifically tattooed with crosses, fascist and Lazio symbols. The hour wore on, and more and more people arrived. I tried not to think about the fact that my coat was going to be ruined by the rain (black velvet does not a waterproof garment make) since it seemed a disrespectful and irrelevant thought.

Just after 13h renewed applause tells us that the service is over, and shortly thereafter the coffin emerges from the church. The massed ranks of ultras - black bomber jackets, baseball caps and sunglasses all round - break out into a chant of "Gabriele uno di noi" (one of us). Then a group start singing a tune I don't recognise - la la la, they're clearly doing the instrumental introduction - and it takes me a moment to realise that it is Vola Lazio Vola, their club song. (I've only ever heard it before from inside the Curva Sud, drowned out by the giallorossi around me).

The Lazio fans across the piazza begin to sing, loudly, and the woman in front of me with the ruined handkerchief starts to sing in a wavering voice, and it suddenly comes on to rain very hard. And everyone is holding their scarves over their heads and I find my eyes begin to water and the woman in front of me breaks down sobbing, and the chorus "Lazio sul prato verde vola, Lazio tu non sarai mai sola, Vola un'aquila nel cielo, piu in alto sempre volerŗ" seems to have been written with a funeral in mind. And I am glad I had the forethought to bring some tissues with me.

After the singing, there are a few more choruses of "Gabriele sempre con noi" and then one or two voices try to start up an anti-police chant. But it lasts only seconds before being hushed and quietly booed, if such a thing is possible, and then someone launches into the national anthem. The Irriducibili and the Banda Noantri next to me all make the Roman salute throughout, predictably, but that's that. No political sloganeering at least.

And then gradually people start to file away, through what is now a downpour. The Lazio players pass in front of me to climb onto their coaches, and then sit in the heavy traffic waiting to move away. They wipe away the condensation on the windows, and stare out at us. Mudingayi (I think) practically presses his face up against the glass. We stare back. A small boy waves and claps. The crowds disperse almost as silently as they came, for the most part. But the group of Lazio ultras, a couple of hundred strong, set off towards the Olimpico. Up to a thousand ultras, apparently, gathered below the Curva Nord there to chant Lazio songs, before dispersing peacefully.

The mentalitŗ Ultrŗ is many things, some good, some bad. But one of them is this. It is those ultras who travelled down from Milan, from Turin, from Udine; or up from Naples, Taranto, Palermo; who spent hours of their own time and who knows how much of their own money, to come on a Wednesday afternoon in November, to stand in the pouring rain in silence for nearly two hours, to pay their respects to a man they never knew. And after standing in the rain, and applauding the family and mourners, and chanting the name of a man they'd not even heard of this time last week, they departed peaceably. Now, you might find that barking mad. But it's hard to see that you could find it objectionable or violent.
Lupo Pazzesco

SSL 1900 wrote:
Lupo Pazzesco wrote:
SSL 1900, have you read 'Football, Fascism & Fandom' about the Roma Boys and the Irriducibli?


I haven't, no. Any good? I remember the funeral of the Boys' leader, Zappavigna, many Lazio lads were present then (Irriducibili, Banda Noantri,...). Still today many Roma and Lazio Ultras join forces when it comes to politics in the streets of Rome.


It's a very interesting read if a little wordy. I was a little surprised by the relationship between the two groups.

Keep posting the Ultra pictures, I think they are a great addition to the board.
Guest

Lupo Pazzesco wrote:
SSL 1900 wrote:
Lupo Pazzesco wrote:
SSL 1900, have you read 'Football, Fascism & Fandom' about the Roma Boys and the Irriducibli?


I haven't, no. Any good? I remember the funeral of the Boys' leader, Zappavigna, many Lazio lads were present then (Irriducibili, Banda Noantri,...). Still today many Roma and Lazio Ultras join forces when it comes to politics in the streets of Rome.


It's a very interesting read if a little wordy. I was a little surprised by the relationship between the two groups.

Keep posting the Ultra pictures, I think they are a great addition to the board.


I'll try to buy it if I can find it.

Toffolo (IRR) and Zappavigna (BOYS), friendly between Laziali and Romanisti some years ago. I believe this was for charity or for a lad in hospital.



Funeral of Paolo Zappavigna, Irriducibili, Banda Noantri and others present, together with the Romanisti.

Guest

March 2010, Lazio plays Bari at home, the Irriducibili invite a politician (Polverini) to the Curva Nord. There are elections in Rome, and while Lazio is fighting against relegation, the Irriducibili find it more important to invite Polverini and support her campaign, than to support Lazio. Many older Ultras are furious, and many lads from groups like Banda Noantri and Ultras - who were coming back from stadium bans at that point - demand answers from the Irriducibili. Firstly they say it is unacceptable to invite such politician, who has been doing campaigns together with Totti and others, certaintly not when Lazio is in trouble, and secondly she was sitting on the portrait of Gabriele, a big mistake.



This would be the very last home match of the Irriducibili. The days after the Bari match, many discussions took place between Ultras on the streets and on the radio stations. Many said that Irriducibili had to step down, and to let others run the Curva Nord. Others believed that it would be impossible to eliminate a group that had been leading the Curva Nord for over twenty years.

Eventually, the older lads that had come back to the stadium (especially Banda Noantri, but also Ultras, Veterani,...) had big plans, beginning in Cagliari, the next match. A couple of hundred strong, the old (real) Ultras made a statement towards the Irriducibili and everyone. They took the lead in the away sector, and Irriducibili was not capable of fighting back.



The next match, at home against Siena, would be the first one without the Irriducibili in the Curva Nord. All Ultras, in the days after Cagliari away, found an agreement. The Irriducibili would step down, and would basically stop their activities. They would no longer be present in the stadiums and would, as a group, no longer exist (only in the hearts and minds of many). The lads of Banda Noantri were to take over the Curva Nord, and they would call the 'new' group (all older lads, some Irriducibili toplads and youth) 'Ultras Lazio'. A simple, clear name.



At home against Siena, the Ultras Lazio are leading the Curva Nord. The Curva is compact like never before, the atmoshpere is one that hadn't been seen since the nineties, absolutely amazing. The new Curva Nord, now officially called 'Curva Nord Gabriele Sandri' is back, stronger than ever before.





The matches that followed - in Milano, at home against Napoli, in Bologna, the derby, in Genova, and so on, the Ultras Lazio show what they're worth. With a beautiful style, compact and coherent, with great mentality, they bring back the glory days of the Curva Nord - something the Irriducibili (with all their business) had ignored to do. The last five years or so, the Curva Nord had lost its status, and was far from the infamous Curva from the eighties and nineties. With Ultras Lazio, the good old days seemed to be back.

In Bologna, 3000 strong. Lazio still fighting against relegation.



Derby, first choreography of Ultras Lazio.

"Since 1900, proud of our colours, pioneers of football in Rome."



In their short existence, however, at the end of last season, the repression was very hard. At the end of last season, around 300 lads were banned from the stadium.

In the meantime, the Tessera del Tifoso was introduced for the season 2010/11. A huge manifestation in Rome, organised by the Laziali, attracts thousands of Ultras from all around Italy. Leaders of many groups sit together, yet an agreement is not found. Every group will come with their own statement and measures to fight the Tessera.

A couple of groups, such as the Curva Sud of Milan and the Curva Nord of Inter (not seen as Ultras anymore by the rest of Italy), accept the Tessera, which you need to get a season ticket. All other groups in Italy do not take the Tessera. Basically all, except for two groups (Ultras Lazio and the Catanesi) don't take the Tessera, but will buy tickets for every home match. Only the Laziali, and the Catanesi, will boycot the Tessera, and therefore the stadium(s), completely.

For almost 6 months, the Ultras Lazio are not present in any stadium, not at home and not in away matches. During many home matches, around hundred lads stand outside the ground to listen to the match on the radio. While Lazio doing brilliantly in the league, their mentality and ideals, as Ultras, are stronger than anything.

Because Lazio was doing so good in the league, however, many gloryhunters came to the stadium, and filled the Curva Nord. They did not listen to the demands of the Ultras to respect the Curva and to leave the bottom rows empty, and they dishonoured the Curva Nord on many occassions. This is the sign for a part of the Ultras Lazio to come back to the stadium and take over their Curva Nord again. The second half of past season, Ultras Lazio are partly back. The atmoshpere gets better and better, yet many are still banned, and many still stay at home or in the pubs out of protest.
Guest

Lecce - Bari













Guest

Lazio



Guest

Interesting, I didn't know the Irriducibili had been disbanded. They were never a likeable bunch though, what with the merchandise profits and all that jazz.

When I saw Lazio, I noticed a lot of people's shirts, banners etc having the number 12 on them... Why is that, a 12th man sort of thing?
Guest

diatribe wrote:
Interesting, I didn't know the Irriducibili had been disbanded. They were never a likeable bunch though, what with the merchandise profits and all that jazz.

When I saw Lazio, I noticed a lot of people's shirts, banners etc having the number 12 on them... Why is that, a 12th man sort of thing?


Exactly, the 12th man of the team, so to speak. And Irriducibili do not exist anymore since the 21st of March 2010, when Banda Noantri took over (in Cagliari). The first home match without Irriducibili, after more than 20 years, was the 24d of March, against Siena.

The new group, Ultras Lazio, called the end of that season the/their "spring of beauty", or "beautiful spring time". Many old faces, amazing Curva Nord, away matches like in the old days. Sadly enough, it didn't last long.
WATPOAE



















I still think the best Ultras in Europe atm are definitely the Germans; seeing as they're being given the freedom of Safe Standing, low prices etc. Also groups in Russia, Poland etc. English scene is fairly bad but groups like the Green Brigade (Celtic) are doing a class job I think.
Guest

These are my favourite 2 viola displays that I've seen:




I'm not sure about German ultras, whilst impressive they don't seem to put on the large scale coreo some other countries do, and aren't as pyromaniac loving. They always sound very vocal though, and seem to have a sense of humour with their banners etc.

I don't know too much about Russia ultras, but Poland definitely has an edge to it. I saw Wisla last month, Lech Poznan fans were banned as they'd been rioting the week, whilst Krakow's hardcore were silent through the first half.
 Then at half time, half of them went downstairs and the other half sprinted to the bank and pressed themselves up against the rear wall... 10 minutes into the second half, they all steam back in and start abusing us along the side?! †I was a bit worried about leaving after the game, but then they stood and clapped us at the end which confused me. And then the players went over there and started chants for them... Sadly though, I didn't make it anywhere near this nawtee looking gaff †
http://www.neoseeker.com/forums/3...33831-worst-away-end-in-football/

I would love to see a game or two in the likes of Turkey, Serbia and/or Croatia. I've been slowly moving away from Italy with regards to foreign trips as it's such a 'mare getting tickets with all the stupid restrictions.
Guest

Whilst on the subject of international ultras, a couple of cool vids from the recent Libertadores final:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJ13qDUXXTI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vbq4LEJ6ehQ

That chant from 2:15 in the second vid, I remember hearing during a game on Bet 365 last year and had it stuck in my head for weeks after. Apart from Argentina though, I think attendances and atmosphere are pretty hit and miss in South America.
WATPOAE

You can't beat this, not Italian, but is amazing.

http://www.ultras-tifo.net/news/2...-split-100-years-celebration.html
Myles

Link release.

WATPOAE wrote:
You can't beat this, not Italian, but is amazing.

http://www.ultras-tifo.net/news/2...-split-100-years-celebration.html
Guest

Haha, especially love the dude atop the church spire with a flare!

Havn't come across that site before, ta for the link. This is where I go for my Italian stuff: http://www.fototifo.it/
Guest

French scene is very good I think (though PSG scene is killed now). Italy, due to Tessera and repression, is on a low. Germany is not chaotic enough for me, too perfect, same for groups like the ones in Vienna (Rapid). Eastern Europe has a massive movement, very impressive, top of Europe though repression is becoming heavy as well.
WATPOAE

SSL 1900 wrote:
French scene is very good I think (though PSG scene is killed now). Italy, due to Tessera and repression, is on a low. Germany is not chaotic enough for me, too perfect, same for groups like the ones in Vienna (Rapid). Eastern Europe has a massive movement, very impressive, top of Europe though repression is becoming heavy as well.


Few months ago it looked like everything was looking alright for them; what with the protests and all the groups merging together for it.
Guest

















Guest

This isn't exactly the correct thread for it, but finally Serbia and Croatia have been drawn to face each other.

Obviously the rivalry isn't sporting based but I'd consider it the most hate filled fixture in football, or elsewhere. I'll be very surprised if away fans are allowed to travel.

When in Serbia a few years ago I asked a few people what would happen if they ever play. One guy's response (in admittedly broken English. but obviously better than my Serb) was "Death. Blood. Gun. Kill. Riot..."

If I can somehow get a ticket for the Croatian leg through an agency, I'd be very tempted to head over. Belgrade's fixture may be a step too far for a Brit.
Guest

I really know nothing about the Serb/Mon/Cro conflict and the rivalries to fall out of it.

Can we (as Juve fans) expect Krasic to be on one side of the dressing room and Vucinic on the other??
Guest

I don't think so, there must have been a fair few Montenegrins, Croats and Serbs who've played on the same team. Boksic and Mihajlovic were at Lazio, Savicevic and Boban at Milan. And that's despite Boban being considered a national hero for this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Waz11ihnY8w

I'm not sure of all the politics, but there are still a lot of open wounds in the Balkans. I don't think Macedonia-Croatia will be as big a fixture, but Serbia's 4 derbies will be very edgy. Plus they're having a lot of social unrest at the moment with a growing right wing, anti-government rallies, anti-EU sentiment, etc.

Edit: Just read that Romania "fans" unfurled a banner with the message "FREE MLADIC" against Bosnia last month. F'n hell. As much as I find the crossover between football and politics fascinating, I wish it didn't happen.
Duncan!

Recently Serbia and Croatia have played against each other in some big international baskeball competitions with little noise or conflics.    

I suppose it might be a bit different in footy though
Guest

Verona



















Guest

Anyone know the tie in between Aberdeen and Hellas from that last set of pictures?
Lupo Pazzesco

Great pictures SSL 1900.

Aberdeen and Hellas Verona?!?! I'm bloody amazed by that Dons flag amongst theirs. God knows how that got there!
Guest

I'm in Asia at the mo, saw a Thai game yesterday and surprisingly there are a few 'ultras.' The playing standard was default Master League style but not too bad an atmosphere.

Still ended up spending all night arguing with Palace and Luton fans though. Twats.
Guest

Also this is Ultras. Oltre i colori... Lazio lads, ex-Banda Noantri, with a banner with 3 names on it. One of the names is Gabriele, their dear friend, that was murdered while sleeping. The two others are fans/Ultras of other clubs. A banner of Banda Noantri once, during the derby against Roma, said: "mentality goes beyond rivalry... Honour to the real Ultras". It's not just about rivalries, it's not just about fighting, hate, and so on. It's about mentality, first and foremost. Respect for those who lead the same way of life.



Quote:
"20/09/2003, Avellino-Napoli. The away fans arrive at the stadium, and they get charged by police without any reason. One of them is Ercolano, a boy in his twenties, a fan of Napoli. He is pushed, crushed, and he falls down, 10 metres. Thirty minutes he lies alone, in pain, because the doctors do not dare to go to him. He fights for his life, but gives up in the hospital of Avellino. Heavy riots occur in the stadium..."


Quote:
"Matteo, "Il Bagna", was an ultra, a member of Boys Parma 1977. He was a young man of 27 years, with a family, a job and many passions. Among which was Parma Football Club. He followed the team home and away and was an active participant in supporting the team.

This afternoon Il Bagna died. He died in a motorway service station, under the frightened gaze of his brothers. Never again will we see his timid smile, never again will we hear his friendly and sanguine voice. Something dear to us, to which we were accustomed, has been suddenly snatched away. And now we feel its absence fiercely.

This is the moment for tears and sadness. For his family, for his friends, for his loved ones. And it is the moment for respect and silence, for those who have a heart and a conscience.

But some people never stop, even in the face of death. They twist the facts, and thanks to a thousand lies, a young life destroyed becomes a means to sustain theories, hold forth, invent scoops. A work of disinformation which develops into truly vulgar profiteering.
There are stories of chains, bars and cudgels. But neither we nor the juventini were armed. There are stories of fighting and brawling, but the two factions never came to blows. There are stories once again about violent supporters and the wish to suspend all away travel, but Il Bagna wasn't killed by other ultras, he died under the wheels of a coach.

Another bloody event, but the ultra is not the aggressor. He is the victim. The truth should be respected, as should the memory of a young man who is no more, and the pain of those who loved Matteo."


Bagna, Ercolano, Gabriele, rest in peace.
Guest

Saw 3 games in Germany this weekend, Schalke-Larnaca (Cyprus), Fortuna Dusseldorf-Dynamo Dresden and Dortmund-Wolfsburg.

Schalke was a bit disappointing, was at the wrong end, no goals and spoke to a couple of fans after who said their fans weren't at their best. You can drink (and smoke) whilst watching at all German games but they have a stupid card system where you pay 10E for one, get 2 beers and a snack and you're left with say 1.50E, which gets you nothing. I really hope that isn't introduced in Italy or England (not that League 1 would be affected), Holland, France and I'm sure others already have it too.

Dusseldorf was a lot more fun. Terracing, 11E entrance, no drink cards and top of the table taking a last minute winner. Their fans were a lot more vocal, Dresden had a good turn out, and we got showered in beer as they scored.

I had a lot of trouble trying to get Dortmund tickets in advance, then it turned out they still had some on the day... Anyway, their ultras were in decent voice and put on a coreografia, which I've only seen twice in person before and that kop end is f'n huge. They went on to win 5-1 with Gotze getting 2.

I'm planning on Hertha Berlin before the end of the season, though that's largely going to be about the clubs and music. It's another country ticked off for me, but Italy is still my favourite place to watch football, and has the most interesting Ultras I've come across.

http://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hp...6102978_10755879_1694941585_n.jpg
http://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hp...6102978_10755933_1811579801_n.jpg
http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hp...286102978_10755980_23322799_n.jpg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8OsANhT2EyQ
Liam

The stadiums/fans in Germany seem to have a good balance of atmosphere and control, unlike England and Italy where there's not much atmosphere and too much violence respectively.

I don't like the goal music all the grounds in Germany play though.  I've no idea why such a bad idea has become so popular.
Mezz

That's some mighty fine soccer blogging there, Phil. Mighty fine.

Cracking pics / video, n'all.
Lupo Pazzesco

diatribe wrote:
I'm planning on Hertha Berlin before the end of the season, though that's largely going to be about the clubs and music.


If you're off to Berghain or Waterfront, be prepared to deny being English and take along a Lady for the added insurance of actually getting in!

Both are ace but an absolute b****** to get in.
ForzaFiori

I was in Berlin over the weekend and went to the Hertha - Monchengladbach game. Got a seat right next to the Ostkurve for 15 Euros. Fantastic Stadium and great fans, shame about the team.
Guest

Cheers for the comments. Ja those are the kind of clubs I'd be looking at going to and I've heard the horror stories, but hoping my German would help.

4 years today since Gabriele Sandri was killed..
Lupo Pazzesco

Good clubs but hyped up beyond recognition! I'm sure your german language skills will help you get in and good luck.

The four years since he died have passed by really quickly. RIP Gabriele Sandri.
Guest



Gabriele vive.
Lupo Pazzesco

Now the fan's passport has been declared illegal in Italy, will attendences pick up again? It would be nice to see large travelling supports unhindered by this silly scheme. Well done to the Codacons!  
Guest

Yay, am no longer jobless so can start planning silly trips again.

Anyway, was there a book on ultra culture that came out about 2 years ago? Am trying to remember the name of it, if anyone knows? Cheers.
Liam

I'm guessing, but would it be this:

http://www.amazon.com/Football-Fa...TF8&qid=1329936720&sr=1-1
Guest

Yep that's the one, thank you!
Mezz

Congrats on the new job!  
Guest

Thank you † It has been a very long three and a half months since I got back from Asia.

The reason I was asking about that book (and I should have checked through this thread first, sorry) is that a Charlton fan's trying to do a documentary on the mini-rise of English ultras and is after some resources to give it context.

I really can't take it seriously over here though, it comes across as so overly contrived and is about 40 years too late. Crystal Palace's "Holmesdale Fanatics" are good for a laugh though, they "boycotted" Ipswich away and stood up for "the working class man" as tickets were £35. You can guess how much we were charged the last time we were at Selhurst.
Liam

Some fans tried an Ultra group at Leicester last season, but they faced a whole load of problems with the club (petty things like flags needing fire safety certificates), and there was probably only about 30-40 at most home matches.

I think the group has now dwindled into nothing as I've not heard anything since the end of last season.

They had good intentions, but English clubs and fans don't seem to want to accept this sort of group.
WATPOAE

Liam wrote:
Some fans tried an Ultra group at Leicester last season, but they faced a whole load of problems with the club (petty things like flags needing fire safety certificates), and there was probably only about 30-40 at most home matches.

I think the group has now dwindled into nothing as I've not heard anything since the end of last season.

They had good intentions, but English clubs and fans don't seem to want to accept this sort of group.


Didn't some of the Leicester lot get banned too?

Celtic are the only group in UK which is decent to be honest. Palace's is fairly good too.

I think that as and when safe standing (hopefully) starts to appear around the UK then the atmosphere will become better and we'll start to see decent groups.

There's talk of a singing section coming into affect at United which I think will be quite good. The people who are doing it are trying to encourage the use of 2-stick flags etc as well which will hopefully make the atmosphere at OT decent again.

Anyway, here's a few pictures from the recent Lazio-Rome match.

AS Roma









SS Lazio





Ultras Roma





"Defend your country
From a democracy that kills"

Ultras Roma about IRR(IDUCIBILI)

Liam

WATPOAE wrote:
Didn't some of the Leicester lot get banned too?

I think some may have been thrown out of matches, but I can't recall if anybody actually got a more permanent ban from the ground.

I think the group was victimised because of the Ultra tag, and and its small size.  There's a much larger section of the ground that stands all game (persistent standing was one of the main issues the group faced), but nothing was done to stop that.  Similarly away fans can stand all game if they want.
Guest

Lech Poznan fans turn up to an Under-8 game and create havoc:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=VLuMT5m8CP8
fantas1sta



"That which is ours was sweated for on the pitch... that which is yours was given to you in the courts. You have never been in B because the statute of limitations saved you."

Liam

fantas1sta wrote:


"That which is ours was sweated for on the pitch... that which is yours was given to you in the courts. You have never been in B because the statute of limitations saved you."


I love it.  It shows people who saw the game outside of Italy that we're sticking 2 fingers up at the 2006 sporting trial verdicts.

Calciopoli is undoubtedly a tiresome subject for some, including Juve fans, but it's important to keep up the 29 Scudetti stance, and to fight for justice.
Guest

Milan's effort from last night, quite original:


Best thing I've seen this week though has been this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlpkGMEOors&feature=player_embedded

FC Magdeburg fans fed up with their team not scoring, take fluorescent arrows in and run around the stand with them pointing at the goal:
fantas1sta

I saw that on another forum, that was great. There's nothing quite like well-planned sarcasm.
Myles

 Brilliant!
Lupo Pazzesco

Great effort by the Milan Ultras but that FC Magdeburg is   . I bet they were knackered after that effort!
Mezz

For anyone who hasn't or can't see the video...





WATPOAE

A few good Ultra sites for those interested-

Ultras Tifo- http://www.ultras-tifo.net/ I'd recomend liking their Facebook page too, post a lot of good pictures on there.

Ultras Worldwide- http://www.ultrasworldwide.net/ultras/

Follow Ultra Style on Facebook too, post pictures almost daily.

On Ultras Tifo forum they've got a huge section of literally every club on the world, some quality vintage pictures too.
Curva Fiesole

Here are the links that WATPOAE tried to post:

A few good Ultra sites for those interested-

Ultras Tifo- http://www.ultras-tifo.net/ I'd recomend liking their Facebook page too, post a lot of good pictures on there.

Ultras Worldwide- http://www.ultrasworldwide.net/ultras/

Follow Ultra Style on Facebook too, post pictures almost daily.

On Ultras Tifo forum they've got a huge section of literally every club on the world, some quality vintage pictures too.

WATPOAE - links aren't allowed until you've posted a set number of times, this is to deter those that want to advertise their websites or post spam.
Lupo Pazzesco

WATPOAE wrote:
A few good Ultra sites for those interested-

Ultras Tifo- http://www.ultras-tifo.net/ I'd recomend liking their Facebook page too, post a lot of good pictures on there.

Ultras Worldwide- http://www.ultrasworldwide.net/ultras/

Follow Ultra Style on Facebook too, post pictures almost daily.

On Ultras Tifo forum they've got a huge section of literally every club on the world, some quality vintage pictures too.


Thanks for the tips, it's always interesting to see what's going on in the world of the Ultras.
Guest

Not quite ultras, but credit to Hartlepool and the effort their fans put in dressing up as Smurfs yesterday:


Also stayed behind for the trophy presentation and lap of honour, definitely a good bunch of supporters.
Lupo Pazzesco

I heard about Hartlepool dressing up as smurfs on another forum but I thought it was a wind up. Well done to them! I think.
Guest



Mezz

Lupo Pazzesco wrote:
Well done to them! I think.


Guest

Palace's ultras are currently boycotting a free newspaper. Put through their doors. Plus the guy they're protesting for's case got adjourned after he got beaten up. By a toilet.

Lupo Pazzesco



I've always had an irrational dislike of Crystal Palace.......
Guest

A few goons have started setting off smoke bombs at our away games, singing 7 Nation Army and calling themselves the "Red Division."

To quote Cartman in that South Park episode where he dresses as a robot and has to put a suppository in Butters' bum: "Lame. Super lame."
Guest

OFK Belgrade fans in youtube mode ;) few years ago...









Views are on number 1994,that's year when group was formed.
Greetings for all ultras and football lovers


Guest

Pre-match at the Olimpico yesterday: http://youtu.be/aHm8RGU_j1Y
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